How Meth Databases Help Landlords

So now we’re to the next level in the war against do-it-yourself home meth labs. The meth-offender database. And yes, I think it was too long coming. If you are a convicted methamphetamine manufacturer, dealer or trafficker within the state of Tennessee, for example, you will be on the list that now includes 400

So now we’re to the next level in the war against do-it-yourself home meth labs. The meth-offender database. And yes, I think it was too long coming. If you are a convicted  methamphetamine manufacturer, dealer or trafficker within the state of Tennessee, for example, you will be on the list that now includes 400 names.

A meth-offender database generally contains the meth offender’s name and birthdate, along with the dates of convictions and locations of meth crimes.

That’s good news for Tennessee as well as for in Minnesota, Illinois, and Montana. Soon it may be good news for real estate investors in Georgia, Maine, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington State and West Virginia, where similar registries also are being considered.

Why is it good news? Because meth labs can put landlords out of business. There is a strong possibility your property could be declared uninhabitable forever if a meth lab is found there. At the very least you will have to go in and clean up a serious mess. That’s if you are able to clean it up. Not only is meth a dangerous, very addictive homemade drug that destroys people, it also destroys property.

And it’s one thing to clean up after a particularly dirty, messy tenant, but it’s quite something else to have your property declared a health hazard that you will never be able to rent out again. It kind of reminds me of the old army films we used to watch in high school about what would happen after a nuclear war. Meth labs are our new 21st century version of radiation poisoning and we’d better stamp them out while we still can.

Yes, some people are ranting about the loss of privacy. Maybe states shouldn’t publish the databases or keep tabs on those who are involved in this dangerous crime.

Is it really double- jeopardy?

Criminals may have the right to remain silent but do they have the right to remain hidden? The Supreme Court ruled three years ago that these folks are a threat to communities. So the databases stay in place for now and that’s a relief for this landlady.