How to Avoid Bad Tenants

Okay, I was having a light Kodak moment with that touchy feely post about being a considerate landlord. Not all tenants fit into the good category.

But frankly, we have very few problems with ours.

Fairy Under ToadstoolOkay, I was having a light Kodak moment with that touchy feely post about being a considerate landlord.  Not all tenants fit into the good category.

 

But frankly, we have very few problems with ours.

 

I know we’ve  all read the horror stories because they’re out there and many of the stories are true.  But I don’t think it’s necessary to get the worst of the worst.  I think your life and the your family are too important to tail spin yourself with deadbeats. 

 

Here are some points from an  interesting post from  the best of Craig’s List.

 

A Landlord writes:

 

“You’re 22 and you don’t know anything!  That’s probably why you call my office to ask me to send a $30/dollar an hour worker over to your house to change a light bulb you can’t reach.  Are you a child?  You didn’t have trouble reaching the ceiling when you sponge painted your bedroom puke orange.

 

By the way, your circuits are flipping because you have 5 computers, an HDTV, 4 regular TV’s and an extra refrigerator in your house.  It’s a HOUSE not Walmart.  Please don’t  tell me that the electric is bad.”

 

Whew!  And that’s just for starters.  He goes on to talk about being sued by a tenant’s lawyer father, drinking parties, lack of responsibility with pets and etc.  Well, we all get the message.

 

After 19 years in property management coupled with my Dad’s 50 years, here’s what works for us. 

Screen that prospective [tag-ice]tenant[/tag-ice].   Let me repeat that.  Screen that prospect well.  Let him know you are on top of things; everything.  You mainly do that by your confidence that is masked behind your body language.

 

Believe me, [tag-tec]deadbeats[/tag-tec] are looking for [tag-self]landlords[/tag-self] who   can be manipulated.  Let them know up front what the rules are.  That’s why we have leases.  But most importantly, get the message across  that you will enforce your lease. 

 

But here’s where a lot of amateurs miss it.  They hammer this stuff in.  You don’t have to do that. Your demeanor is important.  Exude confidence. They’ll pick up on that.  The bad ones will move on to keep looking for a landlord who won’t make them “freak out,” as they so aptly put it.  

 

Because a psychological game of sorts  is going on at the showing.  Your prospect is trying to figure you out.  What sort of landlord will you really be? 

 

Tell him.  You’ll be fair and you take good care of your properties. But you expect the same from him.  The good ones will not only sign with you, but they’ll stay.     

 

    

 

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