Why Should Landlords Take All the Blame for Children’s Lead Poisoning?

Here we go again.

Toys from a famous, well-respected toy maker are being recalled because of [tag-tec]lead paint[/tag-tec].

Why does this interest me as a landlord, especially since I don’t have children?

Because [tag-cat]landlords[/tag-cat] have been taking the blame for the lead poisoning of children for far too long.

Wooden ToysHere we go again.

 

Toys from a famous, well-respected toy maker are being recalled because of [tag-tec]lead paint[/tag-tec].

 

Why does this interest me as a landlord, especially since I don’t have children?

 

Because [tag-cat]landlords[/tag-cat] have been taking the blame for the lead poisoning of children for far too long.

The government supposedly cracked down on this serious problem decades ago when it was believed small tots were being poisoned in their homes.

 

Culprit?  Lead paint on walls and windows.

 

The government told us children were actually eating the paint. 

 

Did it really matter that lead was taken out of paint as far back as  1978?

 

Not with some states such as Massachusetts.    

 

Landlords had to abide by stringent and almost impossible rules even if  walls had been painted  over many times with non-lead paint.

 

Over the years, multiple  studies  have cast doubt that children were actually eating or absorbing as many paint chips as originally thought.  It was also brought to attention that some of the poisoning could have possibly  come from the breathing of lead fumes found in lead gasoline.

 

Now that unleaded gas is the norm, children’s lead levels have decreased. Coincidence?

 

 

So now, we  are beginning to get  some more  real answers.

 

Doesn’t it make sense that children could  possibly absorb some lead as they as chew on, or play with,   toys which  contain lead?

 

And why is it, these companies such as [tag-ice]Fisher Price[/tag-ice]  are not being held to the same strict standards as we?

 

Maybe that’s about to change.  Then again, this warning may be forgotten many  months before Christmas. Parents need to be vigilant. 

 

 

But how could such a problem involving 1 million toys have gone unnoticed for so long? 

 

And why is it  some of the company’s  most popular toys such as Elmo, Big Bird and Dora (whatever that is)  made it to some stores’ shelves?

 

 

I really don’t  understand that. 

 

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